The More You Know... Coronavirus Myths & FAQs

The More You Know... Coronavirus Myths & FAQs

The global outbreak of Coronavirus is a situation that none of us thought we'd experience. We are living in rapidly changing and difficult times and with the CRAZY bombardment of media, it's hard to find the answers to your questions...

And sometimes you don't even know what questions to ask!

In order to provide our community and customers with clarity during these dark times, we've put together a list of common questions and myths.

Top 15 COVID-19 Myths & FAQs

Articles Are Researched But Not Confirmed

Anyone at any age is at risk of getting infected, says Brandon Brown, an associate professor in the Center for Healthy Communities at the UC Riverside School of Medicine in Riverside, California..

It’s true that coronavirus is most likely to severely affect people over age 65 and individuals with underlying health conditions, such as asthma, cancer, diabetes and chronic heart disease.

Source: US News: https://bit.ly/USNewsCoronaMyths

Consuming alcoholic beverages will not protect you from contracting the virus or its effects, Brown says. In fact, in Iran, dozens of people have died from alcohol poisoning after drinking bootleg booze to try to shield themselves from the coronavirus, according to the official Iranian news agency.

Source: US News: https://bit.ly/USNewsCoronaMyths

If you think taking a trip to a sun-drenched vacation spot like the Bahamas or Mexico can shield you from the coronavirus, think again. Being in a warm place – or a cold location – doesn’t affect your risk of infection, Syed says. “It really does not matter if it’s cold or warm outside,” he says. “Right now, traveling may not be a good idea because that usually involves going through crowded places, and that increases your chances of getting infected or transmitting the virus to other people.”

Source: US News: https://bit.ly/USNewsCoronaMyths

Infections like coronaviruses enter the body via the respiratory tract when you breathe in. Some of them might go into your mouth, but even constantly drinking water isn't going to prevent you from catching the virus.

Source: CDC: bit.ly/BBCCoronaVirusInfo

The threat that the virus causing COVID-19 could sicken pets and spread between them and their owners is extremely low, veterinarians say.

Source: WebMD: bit.ly/WebMDCoronaInfo

Viruses can change over time. Occasionally, a disease outbreak happens when a virus that is common in an animal such as a pig, bat or bird undergoes changes and passes to humans. This is likely how the new coronavirus came to be.

Source: World Health Organization: bit.ly/HopkinsMedicineCoronavirus

No. If your child is healthy, there is no need for them to wear a facemask. Only people who have symptoms of illness or who are providing care to those who are ill should wear masks.

Source: CDC: bit.ly/CDCMasks

Like the common cold, there is no specific antibiotic or medicine recommended to prevent or treat the new coronavirus. Antibiotics do not work against viruses, only bacteria.

Source: World Health Organization: bit.ly/WHOCoronavirusInfo

No. Hand dryers are not effective in killing the 2019-nCoV. To protect yourself against the new coronavirus, you should frequently clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water.

Source: World Health Organization: bit.ly/WHOCoronavirusInfo

No. Spraying alcohol or chlorine all over your body will not kill viruses that have already entered your body. Spraying such substances can be harmful to clothes or mucous membranes.

Source: World Health Organization: bit.ly/WHOCoronavirusInfo

Garlic is a healthy food that may have some antimicrobial properties. However, there is no evidence from the current outbreak that eating garlic has protected people from the new coronavirus.

Source: World Health Organization: bit.ly/WHOCoronavirusInfo

No, there is no evidence to suggest that it can be transmitted by mosquitoes.

Source: World Health Organization: bit.ly/WHOCoronavirusInfo

There are no circumstances in which gargling bleach might benefit your health. Bleach is corrosive and can cause serious damage.

Source: John Hopkins Medicine: bit.ly/HopkinsMedicineCoronavirus

From previous research into similar coronaviruses, including those that cause SARS and MERS and are similar to SARS-CoV-2, scientists believe that the virus cannot survive on letters or packages for an extended time.

Source: Medical News Today: bit.ly/MedNewsTodayCoronavirus

No, you cannot.

Source: Medical News Today: bit.ly/MedNewsTodayCoronavirus

That's not true. About 81% of people who are infected with the coronavirus have mild cases of COVID-19, according to a study published Feb. 18 by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Source: Live Science: bit.ly/LiveScienceInfo

Bookmark this page: https://www.nukrypton-tees.com/COVID19faq

We will keep this page up to date as the COVID 19 situation develops.